Archive - February 2013

Testimonials

…as a teacher (as well as an RN), it makes my day to be teaching with the models now. I know my students are really learning anatomy by building in clay both in my live classes and my distance learning interactive television classes. I cannot imagine learning anatomy and physiology without the models!

Valerie Heuchert, RN, Health Careers Instructor, North Valley Career and Technical Center, Grafton, ND



Mini Lesson #1: Identifying Biological Structures of the Brain

An effective way to approach the ANATOMY IN CLAY® Learning System is to focus on building biological structures for one area of the body. This method leads to an in-depth understanding of how body components and body systems are interrelated in form and function.

Here is one of our favorite Mini Lessons: Identifying Biological Structures of the Brain

  • Lead students in building the following components of the brain using clay (use an anatomy reference if necessary):
  1. Cerebrum
  2. Cerebellum
  3. Medulla Oblongata
  4. Pons
  5. Spinal Cord
  6. Prefrontal Cortex
  7. Motor Strip
  8. Sensory Strip
  9. Parietal Lobe
  10. Frontal Lobe
  11. Occipital Lobe
  12. Temporal Lobe
  13. Amygdala
  14. Pineal Body
  15. Thalamus
  16. Hypothalamus
  17. Hippocampus
  18. Corpus Callosum

Brain Assessment with numbered pins identifying brain structures

 

 

  • Number the pins 1 through 18.
  • Have students “pin” the number that correlates with the specific area of the brain.

Check out another brain building activity on our website created by one of our lead educators for Alzheimers Awareness.

What is one of your favorite lessons or which body system do you especially love to build and why?

Brain Assessment image © 2013 Zahourek Systems Inc.

We Want to Hear From You!

This week we are reaching out to our community of educators and students asking:

What do you want to know about the ANATOMY IN CLAY® Learning System?

Anything goes!

Let us know if there are lessons or topics you would like to see covered in this blog; or, submit any questions you might have about our learning system.

We are eager to hear from you and hope you will share your thoughts with others here.

Washing and Storing Your Models and Clay

The cleaning and storing of your ANATOMY IN CLAY® models and clay is an important part of ensuring your materials endure continued hands-on learning.

Here are a few simple maintenance tips that will keep your models and clay in good shape:

  1. Remove as much clay as possible from the models, separating the different colors into piles. For clay that is impossible to un-mix, save for the creation of a diseased organ or gray matter. Roll clay into golf ball-sized pieces.
  2. Store balls of clay by color in separate bins. You may want to cover the bins to keep any dust or debris out of the clay, but it is not necessary to prevent the oil-based clay from drying out.
  3. Soak models in a solution of warm water and dish soap for a few minutes then scrub with a soft sponge. Test tube cleaner brushes are useful for cleaning small nooks and crannies. Mr. Clean Magic Erasers also work well. Let models air dry or wipe with a towel before storing.
  4. Keep the models assembled when storing—if you have the room. It will save time as well as eliminate lost or misplaced screws and spare parts.

After you’ve followed these steps, your models and clay will be clean and ready for your next class or workshop.

 

 

Seeing the Art in Anatomy and Exploring Anatomy Through Art

Jennifer Hellier presenting at the Arts in Medicine Lecture Series. Photo ©2013 Zahourek Systems™

Anatomy has long been a part of art history. Many famous artists, from Michelangelo to Rembrandt, studied anatomy, attended dissections, and created amazing anatomical drawings for educational purposes.
But beyond fine art, as human beings, we could think of ourselves as the ultimate embodiment of art–view our bodies as living, breathing sculptures–the one and only piece of art we will own from the time of our birth to our death. Read More

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